Tuesday, September 2, 2014

From Benedict Cumberbatch To Colin Firth: The Smouldering Men Of The GQ Awards

E.
BY REBECCA MERRIMAN  Google+ ON SEPTEMBER 2, 2014



Move over Kim Kardashian because it’s all about the guys tonight at the GQ Men of the Year Awards. While it’s so often the ladies who steal the show at award ceremonies, with their thigh high splits and barely there dresses, tonight is all about celebrating the rugged, handsome types and there’s more than a few to go around.



Benedict Cumberbatch being adorable and suave and Douglas Booth looking so perfect, we could almost cry? We think it's time the spotlight was shone on the guys a bit more.



We never would have wanted to miss Gerard Butler giving a seriously cute, candid smile as he posed backstage decked out in head-to-toe Hugo Boss.

Douglas Booth won Most Stylish Man of the Year, we can't think why! (We're joking, it's pretty darn obvious)




READ MORE HERE: http://www.entertainmentwise.com/news/156745/1/From-Benedict-Cumberbatch-To-Colin-Firth-The-Smouldering-Men-Of-The-GQ-Awards

'Gracepoint' Fox: David Tennant Questions Killer's Identity In New Featurette [VIDEO]

ENSTARS
By Vanessa Frith, EnStars
on Sep 01, 2014 06:39 AM EDT

Gracepoint

The American reimagining of ITV's Broadchurch will feature Tennant as Detective Emmet Carver, an out-of-towner whose new job takes him to a small California coastal town and pairs him up with Detective Ellie Miller (Anna Gunn). Together, the two must solve the mystery of a young boy's death while the entire town falls suspect.

"Gracepoint is, more than anything else, a whodunit," explained executive producer Dan Futterman in a new featurette. "You learn who everybody is in the town and how they're related to each other. You find out somebody's died and you know, all those people we just met, it's probably one of them that's responsible for this."



The American reimagining of ITV's Broadchurch will feature Tennant as Detective Emmet Carver, an out-of-towner whose new job takes him to a small California coastal town and pairs him up with Detective Ellie Miller (Anna Gunn). Together, the two must solve the mystery of a young boy's death while the entire town falls suspect.

"Gracepoint is, more than anything else, a whodunit," explained executive producer Dan Futterman in a new featurette. "You learn who everybody is in the town and how they're related to each other. You find out somebody's died and you know, all those people we just met, it's probably one of them that's responsible for this."


READ MORE HERE: http://www.enstarz.com/articles/45159/20140901/gracepoint-fox-david-tennant-questions-killers-identity-in-new-featurette-video.htm


Monday, September 1, 2014

‘Sons of Anarchy’ Charlie Hunnam Beats ‘Fifty Shades of Grey’ Jamie Dornan As ‘King Arthur’

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS TIMES
By Riza Ornos | September 1, 2014 4:42 PM EST



Known as SAMCRO's president Jax Teller, "Sons of Anarchy" star Charlie Hunnam, is a top choice to play King Arthur in the upcoming six-series movie. Beating top contenders for the role including "Fifty Shades of Grey" replacement Jamie Dornan, Hunnam is close to signing the contract with director Guy Ritchie.

The sexy Irish actor reportedly returned the favour to Hunnam after scoring the role on E.L. James movie adaptation. Based on reports, Dornan removed himself out of the running for the epic movie as his scheduled clashed with his commitments with "Fifty Shades." Set to premiere on Valentine's Day 2015, the highly anticipated movie was dropped by the SOA star due his show's scheduling conflicts which is currently in its final season.



Poised to reprise his role as Raleigh Becket in Guillermo del Toro's summer hit sequel "Pacific Rim," the Newcastle-born actor is going to have a busy movie career after he wraps up "Sons of Anarchy." Playing one of the most iconic characters in film and English Literature, Hunnam is going to trade his Harley into an Excalibur.

"When you see Hunnam as Jax Teller leading the Sons into the final brutal revenge filled final season, I think you'll agree that he has all the intensity necessary to play King Arthur, and that this is a better post-Sons course for him than playing the S&M fetishist billionaire Christian Grey," Deadline's Mike Fleming Jr. exclusively reports. "A role that Sutter and I agreed is better suited to a newcomer than an established actor on the cusp of movie stardom."


READ MORE HERE: http://au.ibtimes.com/articles/564819/20140901/sons-anarchy-charlie-hunnam-fifty-shades-grey.htm#.VAUQmPldVls

Colin Firth creates magic with Woody

THE WEST AUSTRALIAN
FILM
Magic in the Moonlight (PG)
3.5 stars
Colin Firth, Emma Stone
DIRECTOR WOODY ALLEN
REVIEW MARK NAGLAZAS

Firth creates magic with Woody

If Woody Allen had filmed his latest bonbon in black and white, as he's done on several other occasions (Manhattan, Stardust Memories, The Purple Rose of Cairo) it might be mistaken for a movie that was actually made during Hollywood's Golden Age.

Its main setting is a sumptuous spread on the Riviera, characters linger in drawing rooms and gardens engaged in witty exchanges, lovers speed along winding cliff-side roads overlooking the Mediterranean and Colin Firth plays a magician who dresses up as a Chinaman, replete with stringy moustache and pulled-back eyes.



Of course, we have seen all this tongue-in-cheek nostalgia before in Allen movies. But Magic in the Moonlight feels the most insistently old-fashioned work in memory, so much so it doesn't take too much imagination to see Cary Grant and Katharine Hepburn in the lead roles (it's the closest he has come to making a screwball comedy).

What Magic in the Moonlight lacks in originality - some have complained it's so familiar as to be redundant, right down to the Allen obsession with death and the meaningless of existence - it makes up for in polish, wit, a lightness of touch and, most of all, exuberant, nicely judged performances.



Where once Allen's male stars did a pale imitation of himself, more recent stand-ins are their own men, with Firth throwing off his signature stammering Englishmen to play an acid- tongued egotist and world-class misanthrope who both infuriates and charms with his every biting putdown ("Autographs are for morons," Firth's magician Stanley Crawford tells a fan of his on-stage alter-ego Wei Ling Soo).

Stanley is so disparaging of mankind's need for belief in the afterlife that he has a lucrative sideline exposing mediums as frauds, using his knowledge of chicanery to save the weak- minded from being fleeced (Harry Houdini also moonlighted as a debunker of mystics).

When Stanley is approached by an old friend to unmask a young woman named Sophie (Emma Stone), who has entranced a wealthy American widow living in the South of France by claiming to be able to communicate with her late husband, he is there in a flash, his mental tools sharpened and at the ready.

However, Sophie is no pushover. She quickly sees through Stanley's guise and eventually plucks from the air his deepest secrets - Stone has fun mimicking the melodramatic arm-waving antics of movie mediums - shaking his firm believe that nothing exists beyond the grave.



Indeed, Sophie unlocks him from the prison of his own cynicism, releasing him to more fully embrace the here and now, which he claims is the only reality we know. Of course, love blossoms in this F. Scott Fitzgerald-ish playground for the rich and famous, or something like it, as Sophie's big smile and vivacity causes Stanley to question his relationship to his more eminently suitable fiance.

It could be claimed that Firth is too old for Stone (and that Allen is revealing his own dubious fixations) but they are lovely together.

Indeed, the mismatch in ages actually feels right for the period when such disparities were commonplace.

READ MORE HERE: https://au.news.yahoo.com/thewest/entertainment/movies/a/24862863/firth-creates-magic-with-woody/






Michael Keaton, Benedict Cumberbatch and Steve Carell signal lift-off for Oscar's Best Actor category

HITFIX
By Kristopher Tapley  

Best Actor Oscar race heats up in Telluride

TELLURIDE — If you asked me to pick between the three commanding, sure-fire awards-contending lead actor performances on display at this year's Telluride Film Festival, I'd have a break down. Yet that's just what Academy voters will surely be asked to do in a few months' time, with added pressure in the form of whoever fills out the rest of the competitive category.

In "Birdman," Michael Keaton may well end up putting forth the most compelling case for a win. Not to get too far ahead of ourselves, but some things are just patently obvious. Keaton is resurrected by this film, a tried-and-true narrative that we just saw play out last year with Matthew McConaughey. More than that, he's revealing shades of a character that will no doubt connect with actors, presenting the very id of a soul desperate to perform but hamstrung and even quarantined by the realities of the "business" of "show business."


In "The Imitation Game," Benedict Cumberbatch delivers his career-best work in a biopic that is sure to find Academy love and adoration across the board. "Birdman" certainly left a crater, but Morten Tyldum's film feels very much like the breakout of the festival. It's on everyone's lips and I've overheard more than a few compare the experience to the "King's Speech" coming out of 2010. And a lot of that stems from the undeniable layers Cumberbatch exhibits in his performance as ill-fated computer pioneer Alan Turing, finding graceful emotional notes amid the otherwise eccentric playground of the film's subject.


Read more at http://www.hitfix.com/in-contention/best-actor-oscar-race-heats-up-in-telluride#vsIywHbc493cuzel.99